Assignment 5: Removing the Figure

Assignment 5: Removing the figure

Assignment five – Removing the figure

‘’Look back at the themes we’ve examined relating to place and our presence within it. What areas inspired you most?

The culmination of this course is a self-directed assignment where you have free rein to choose a subject that relates to any of the material discussed in the course. You may have gathered skills and insights through the projects that you want to revisit or you may have been inspired by other ideas.

The only stipulation is that the final outcome must represent a notion of identity and place that you are personally inspired by. Make sure that your work is visually consistent, relevant to the subject matter you choose and holds together well as a set, both visually and conceptually.

Think carefully about your editing decisions.

  • Which images need to be there?
  • Which ones repeat other images?
  • Are you holding on to a favourite that is no longer required?
  • Do you need to re-shoot anything? Aim for a coherent set of no more than 15 pictures, accompanied by a reflective commentary of no more than 500 words.’’

 

Reflection

‘’Before you send your work to your tutor, check it against the assessment criteria listed in the introduction to this course guide and make sure that it meets all the criteria. Make your evaluation available to your tutor.’’

Reworking your assignment

‘’Following feedback from your tutor, you may wish to rework some of your assignment, especially if you plan to submit your work for formal assessment. If you do this, make sure you reflect on what you’ve done, and why, in your learning log.’’

 

There has had to be a change of plan for this assignment.  Having agreed a date and time for going round to take images of the Station Hotel, when I went round for the images at closing time the bar was closing earlier than normal due to a lack of customers.  So that knocked that idea out of the window.  I was unable to reorganise a day and time, so I’ve decided to change the theme.

I will continue with the similar theme of the previous assignment, which was the closure of pubs and the effect that a number of issues have had on the increase in closures.  An issue identified is that there are far more people drinking at home compared to decades ago.  One of the reasons for this was the lower price of alcohol in super markets and non-pub establishments.

In an exercise earlier in the module I included a series of images of different beers that I drank and shared online as ‘’The GoodBeerTweet’’ series.  I post images of the beers that I drink to the @GoodBeerTweet account and few others and these are then shared to the followers of each account.  It’s a great way to find out about beers and which you should avoid (there is a @ShitBeerAccount also).

For the assignment, as I couldn’t gain access to the pub for the images, I have decided to capture the outside of the establishments but away from the front of the buildings.  I will look to take images of the rear of a pub where you often find the evidence of its activities.  I am looking to capture the kegs and casks along with the bottles and rubbish that you’d expect from a pub.  This I feel ties in with the self-absented nature of the assignment, in that you are not seeing the inside of the bar nor are you seeing the alcohol poured, or any of the patrons.  Not only am I not there, but neither is anything you’d expect from a bar.

I will also take images of my glass recycle box at home and the contents of the box on the table, which will mimic the @GoodBeerTweet type of images that I share online.  The idea is to tie in that my drinking at home, along with large numbers of the population, has had a negative impact on the numbers of people drinking at pubs and bars.  It also highlights the issues still surrounding problem drinking within the UK.  Having looked at the empty bottles I realised just how has been drunk over a short period of time.

This work is ongoing and not fully realised.  Time constraints have not helped and I will look to fill this out over the coming couple of months.

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Assignment 5: Removing the Figure

Assignment 5: Removing the figure – Research

Assignment five – Removing the figure – Research

‘’Look back at the themes we’ve examined relating to place and our presence within it. What areas inspired you most?

The culmination of this course is a self-directed assignment where you have free rein to choose a subject that relates to any of the material discussed in the course. You may have gathered skills and insights through the projects that you want to revisit or you may have been inspired by other ideas.

The only stipulation is that the final outcome must represent a notion of identity and place that you are personally inspired by. Make sure that your work is visually consistent, relevant to the subject matter you choose and holds together well as a set, both visually and conceptually.

Think carefully about your editing decisions.

  • Which images need to be there?
  • Which ones repeat other images?
  • Are you holding on to a favourite that is no longer required?
  • Do you need to re-shoot anything? Aim for a coherent set of no more than 15 pictures, accompanied by a reflective commentary of no more than 500 words.’’

 

Reflection

‘’Before you send your work to your tutor, check it against the assessment criteria listed in the introduction to this course guide and make sure that it meets all the criteria. Make your evaluation available to your tutor.’’

Reworking your assignment

‘’Following feedback from your tutor, you may wish to rework some of your assignment, especially if you plan to submit your work for formal assessment. If you do this, make sure you reflect on what you’ve done, and why, in your learning log.’’

 

I have decided that I’ll take images of the interior of a pub or pubs either before they have opened or after they have closed.  The idea is to capture the buildings before they open and just after they close to capture signs of use and activity without anyone being there, myself included.  In this respect I’ll be capturing an environment that I am familiar with and have grown up with.  The pubs I intend to capture are those I’ve frequented over the years from when I first started drinking through to today, although I don’t visit that often as I now drink at home, unless I visit a bar that specialises in craft beers.  I am part of the reason that bars are closing at very high rates throughout the country.

Ewan Munro has been taking photographs of London pubs over a seven year period so as to record buildings that are pubs now ad buildings that were pubs.  As this is London, the series could go on for ever as pubs will change names or close down and become other businesses, Munro does allude to this in the Vice article.  This is a similar idea that I carried out for previous assignment and a series I will have to explore more of.

Jan J Klos has captured a series of images of the interiors and the staff of traditional East End London pubs.  In the Vice article it touches on the same themes as I have regarding the rate that pubs are closing down.  This takes the idea another step along by introducing the staff of the pubs within the establishment.  The images have a documentary feel as it’s likely that over the coming year some will close for good to be converted into something else or be made over so as to appeal to a different clientele.  These images and those of Munro are a good base for me to work from with this project.

Now I have to contact a couple of pubs and arrange a date and time for taking the images.

 

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3563358/Photographer-captures-series-eerie-pictures-showing-disappearing-pubs-Australian-outback.html

https://www.standard.co.uk/news/london/unseen-london-photographer-captures-the-interiors-of-the-capitals-most-treasured-buildings-9780319.html

https://i-d.vice.com/en_uk/article/evxypk/a-photographic-guide-to-the-disappearing-pubs-of-east-london

https://stevemiddlehurstcontextandnarrative.wordpress.com/2015/05/03/auto-focus-the-self-portrait-in-contemporary-photography-by-susan-bright/

https://blascontextnarrative.wordpress.com/2016/04/22/self-absent-portraiture/

http://www.billbradshaw.co.uk/photography/pubs

https://www.vice.com/en_uk/article/ppxmby/pub-photographs

Assignment 5: Removing the Figure

Assignment 5: Removing the Figure – Initial thoughts

Assignment five – Removing the figure – Initial thoughts

‘’Look back at the themes we’ve examined relating to place and our presence within it. What areas inspired you most?

The culmination of this course is a self-directed assignment where you have free rein to choose a subject that relates to any of the material discussed in the course. You may have gathered skills and insights through the projects that you want to revisit or you may have been inspired by other ideas.

The only stipulation is that the final outcome must represent a notion of identity and place that you are personally inspired by. Make sure that your work is visually consistent, relevant to the subject matter you choose and holds together well as a set, both visually and conceptually.

Think carefully about your editing decisions.

  • Which images need to be there?
  • Which ones repeat other images?
  • Are you holding on to a favourite that is no longer required?
  • Do you need to re-shoot anything? Aim for a coherent set of no more than 15 pictures, accompanied by a reflective commentary of no more than 500 words.’’

 

Reflection

‘’Before you send your work to your tutor, check it against the assessment criteria listed in the introduction to this course guide and make sure that it meets all the criteria. Make your evaluation available to your tutor.’’

Reworking your assignment

‘’Following feedback from your tutor, you may wish to rework some of your assignment, especially if you plan to submit your work for formal assessment. If you do this, make sure you reflect on what you’ve done, and why, in your learning log.’’

 

 

For the final assignment I will continue the theme of alcohol and what it means to me.  As the series requires me to be absent from the images I felt that I could reassess some of the ideas that had been discussed at my study day with other OCA students a couple of months back.

For the last assignment I used an idea put forward by one of the OCA study fgroup members, which was to capture current and former pubs where I live.  This was inspired by the articles that I’d found on why there are large numbers of pubs closing every week.  Two remaining ideas that were mentioned were as follows:

  • Photograph the interior of a pub before and after closing time as the establishment takes on a different feel to when it is open.
  • Photograph the exteriors of pubs away from the front and at the rear to capture the working of them, the kegs and casks waiting to be picked up etc.

I feel that I should try and capture the interiors of the pubs before and after they have patrons inside them.  This will give a different perspective on their appearance and neither I or anyone else will be in the premises, but there will still be evidence of activity.

For this I will have to be in contact with a pub to gain access before and after it closes.  I will try a few pubs from Stonehaven, but I know the owners of both the Marine Hotel and The Station Hotel, so these are the most likely to be of use for this project.

 

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3563358/Photographer-captures-series-eerie-pictures-showing-disappearing-pubs-Australian-outback.html

https://www.standard.co.uk/news/london/unseen-london-photographer-captures-the-interiors-of-the-capitals-most-treasured-buildings-9780319.html

Part 4: 00 - Image and Text

Assignment 4: Image and Text

Assignment 4: Image and text

‘’Create a series of work (aim for 7–10 images) which in some way reflects upon the ideas surrounding identity and place that you’ve looked at so far in this course. Use the written word to play a part in its creation.

You may be inspired by a poem, song or a novel or decide to write your own fictive piece. You may draw upon other people’s words via eavesdropping or another source or use extracts from journals. You might find interesting textual accounts in archives in libraries that could inform this assignment. Allow your creativity to be spurred on by spending time with these words and reflecting on them.

Be wary of illustrating your text with pictures and vice versa. Allow for the viewers’ interpretation to be opened up rather than shut down by the pairings. You may decide not to include the actual words in the final production; that’s fine, as long as they have in some way informed the research and development of the concepts and have pushed the imagery further as a result.

Write a short reflective commentary (around 500 words) describing how your chosen ‘words’ have informed your series of images and make this available to your tutor alongside your images.’’

Reflection

‘’Before you send your work to your tutor, check it against the assessment criteria listed in the introduction to this course guide and make sure that it meets all the criteria. Make your evaluation available to your tutor. Your tutor may take a while to get back to you. Carry on with the course while you are waiting, but please don’t attempt the next assignment until you’ve received your tutor’s feedback on this one.’’

Reworking your assignment

‘’Following feedback from your tutor, you may wish to rework some of your assignment, especially if you plan to submit your work for formal assessment. If you do this, make sure you reflect on what you’ve done, and why, in your learning log.’’

 

I have decided that the text to go along with the images will be taken from some of the literature analysing the decline of pubs in the UK.  I felt that this is more in keeping with the images I have produced.

I had intended to alternate between establishments that still function as bars and those that have been developed for other uses, but feel that only including images of former bars will have a stronger narrative.  The text that inspired the imagery comes from analysis surrounding closure of bars and pubs.

Nearly all of the buildings that were once bars have been converted into housing of some sort, with two exceptions being My Place and the Wine Bar, both of which are situated in the center of the town and are now gallery at 55 and Aly Bali B, respectively.  St Leonard’s Hotel, The Mill Inn and The Eldergrove have retained their names to this day and all have kept their characteristics from when they were bars/hotels.  The door at what was The Star Bar has kept the same character, whilst the entrance to The White Heather is only slightly farther forward than it was when a bar and keeps the door and window in close proximity, the tiles are also the same as it’s time as a bar and the windows are wooden sash, which leads me to believe that the building may be a B listed building.  That would explain why the building has kept it’s character.  What was The Commodore Hotel was completely flattened and the flats that are now in it’s place bare no resemblance to the building.

Both My Place and the Wine Bar were before my time, so I’ve never known them as drinking establishments.  As I grew up, My Place had always been a bike shop called Wheels where you could buy bikes and have your bike repaired.  At The St Leonard’s I had my first pint in a pub, I was 15 and at a cousin’s wedding.  I will look out a picture I had taken of me with the pint in my hand and post up here.  The only time I tried to drink at The Mill Inn I was thrown out for being under age or too drunk to serve.  The White Heather had a very low ceiling and was where all the older fishing folks would drink as The Ship Inn and The Marine tended to have more tourists and visitors.  The White Heather was very much a drinkers pub, with a pool table and always smokey.  The Eldergrove was where you went for High Teas, but this was one of the pubs we visited on the way in to town on a Saturday night.  There always tended to be great sessions of folk musicians on the Folk Festival weekend.  The Star Bar was a ‘Rangers’ pub for a number of years then became a ‘Celtic’ pub latterly.  It was a bar we’d visit, but not too often.

The Commodore Hotel, in it’s day, was one of the best hotels in the north of Scotland.  It had lost that appeal some years before I started going out drinking but there was always the ‘Commie’ on a Saturday night.  This is where you ended up until 2 or 3 in morning and would stagger back from.  It wasn’t particularly great and the music played was standard, small town, Saturday night disco fare, but it’s where you had to be seen.  The floor was sticky and you didn’t want to fall down, it smelt of stale beer and vomit and the toilets were always blocked.  Every week there were several fights inside and out with the police always in close proximity.  It was a night out where you were required to be very drunk before you could enjoy yourself and I guess there are thousands of places across the country that are either like it or were like it.  For all the faults it had and the complaints we made about it at the time, everyone who were regulars, talks about it with a fondness that is somewhat divergent from the descriptions people have of it.

There are a few other former bars that I’ve not included.  Two I had forgotten about and the third I didn’t feel the image was good enough.  I’ll revisit the third and take images of the two I have missed.

Below is a gallery of the pubs and bars that are still in use today, all of which I have drank in at some point and few that I still do when out in Stonehaven.

 

 

 

On advice from my tutor, I’ve decided to use B & W versions of the images the colours of the cars distract from the subject – the pubs/former pubs.  Having looked at the B & W versions I have to agree with Andrea.  Below are the converted images:

 

Assignment 4: Image & Text

Assignment 4: Image and Text – research II

Assignment 4: Image and text – research II

‘’Create a series of work (aim for 7–10 images) which in some way reflects upon the ideas surrounding identity and place that you’ve looked at so far in this course. Use the written word to play a part in its creation.

You may be inspired by a poem, song or a novel or decide to write your own fictive piece. You may draw upon other people’s words via eavesdropping or another source or use extracts from journals. You might find interesting textual accounts in archives in libraries that could inform this assignment. Allow your creativity to be spurred on by spending time with these words and reflecting on them.

Be wary of illustrating your text with pictures and vice versa. Allow for the viewers’ interpretation to be opened up rather than shut down by the pairings. You may decide not to include the actual words in the final production; that’s fine, as long as they have in some way informed the research and development of the concepts and have pushed the imagery further as a result.

Write a short reflective commentary (around 500 words) describing how your chosen ‘words’ have informed your series of images and make this available to your tutor alongside your images.’’

Reflection

‘’Before you send your work to your tutor, check it against the assessment criteria listed in the introduction to this course guide and make sure that it meets all the criteria. Make your evaluation available to your tutor. Your tutor may take a while to get back to you. Carry on with the course while you are waiting, but please don’t attempt the next assignment until you’ve received your tutor’s feedback on this one.’’

Reworking your assignment

‘’Following feedback from your tutor, you may wish to rework some of your assignment, especially if you plan to submit your work for formal assessment. If you do this, make sure you reflect on what you’ve done, and why, in your learning log.’’

 

Having looked at the options for consideration for assignment 4, I think I will continue with the theme of alcohol.  I attended a study visit day at Street Level Works in Glasgow on 15/07/17 to speak about our current work and to hear from other students.  The study day is chaired/organised by Wendy McMurdo and there were three other students, along with myself.  We do a Pecha Kucha presentation with 20 images for 20 seconds and discuss what we are doing and plan to do, although I was only one to do this, the three other students all had work to discuss but two (Yiann and Gesa) did this via a short video with sound and the third a book of sketches/paintings (Laurie, who is studying drawing).

Having shown my current work and discussed ideas, the group made some suggestions for me going forward with the work on alcohol.  I had mentioned that I’d like to spend time over the course of a year or so taking images at a pub in Stonehaven.  The pub in question is The Market Bar on the town square.  It’s one of the last remaining, traditional pubs left in Stonehaven and hasn’t changed a great deal over the years.  It has always had the reputation of being a ‘drinker’s pub’.  Whilst the idea of spending a period of time recording a pub was thought of as a good idea, there were a few suggestions made that could be carried out over a shorter period and help give a fuller picture, of what could be an effective project.

  • Typologies of pubs and sites of former pubs.
  • Images of the rear of pubs, showing used bottles, crates, kegs, bins etc.
  • Images of the interiors of pubs before they open and after they’ve just closed.
  • Images of recycling box with bottles before recycling.
  • Areas of outside drinking where evidence has been left behind, but not images of people drinking as this could be deemed exploitative.

All of these suggestions could be worked on and added to the images I already have surrounding alcohol.

When I was younger, there was always the dubious claim to fame of Stonehaven having the highest concentration of pubs per head of population.  However, having looked this up and not finding any evidence, it would most likely appear to a local myth.  That’s not to say there weren’t a great deal of pubs or licensed premises in the town, there were.  But I suspect that it was most likely the same concentration as any other town in Scotland at the time.  The number of pubs have declined over the years in line with the experiences of many other towns and cities throughout the country.  It was around the time that I started going out to drink in pubs that there was a noticeable decline in the number of patrons.  The reason for this I always thought was that Supermarkets began selling discounted alcohol and was the main driver of pub closures, but these two articles from Institute of Economic Affairs and The Telegraph give a more nuanced insight into the reasons.  Essentially cheaper alcohol from super markets, changing drinking habits, high taxes for pubs and alcohol and the smoking ban along with rent increases for property and land value which has made housing/flat development a more lucrative source of money for land use.

I was going through my playlist when the song Thirsty and Miserable came on from the band Saint Vitus.  This is a cover version of a song written by Black Flag.  Both bands are firm favourites of mine, having listened to both for years.  The song was written as a commentary on people who have to get drunk to enjoy themselves, or end up as alcoholics.  The Saint Vitus version is again commentary, but from the viewpoint of the alcohol dependant individual as the singer Scott ‘’Wino’’ Weinrich has a history of substance misuse, which is covered in songs written by him.

The Black Flag version is a two minute hardcore punk explosion, whilst the Saint Vitus version is a slower tempo befitting of a Doom metal band.  Although slower than the original, the tempo is rather perky in comparison to other work by Saint Vitus and does have a rather frantic finale to it.  Saint Vitus are one of the first bands to be described as Doom Metal, a style that down tunes guitars and plays much slower tempo music and very much influenced by Black Sabbath.  Song lyrics tend to be about alcohol or substance misuse, depression, anxiety, death and general misanthropy, it’s not pop music or for those wanting an easy listen.

I’ve included this song as part of the assignment as it had come up on my playlist when I was listening to my music collection on shuffle, not something I usually do.  The Saint Vitus version came on and jogged my memory surrounding this song and a few others by both bands that touch on the negative side of alcohol – Drinking and Driving and Six Pack by Black Flag and Dependence by Saint Vitus.  What struck me was the darker side these songs portrayed in comparison to the side of alcohol I captured at the beer festival for my previous assignment.  Where the beer festival was all smiling faces and civilised drinking, there are still major issues surrounding alcohol consumption in Scotland and the rUK.  This was touched upon in my previous research for Assignment 3.

The lyrics to the song certainly have resonance with me.  They remind me of my younger days and binge drinking at the weekends or on holiday.  Although I wasn’t necessarily miserable, I did use alcohol to cope with mental health issues, which wasn’t a healthy or constructive way of dealing with the situation.  I am also aware that there have been occasions over the years where I have just managed to pull myself back from having an alcohol problem.  I’ve had enough awareness to realise this but not had the tools to tackle the issues so as to stop.  Fortunately I know have greater insight into the issues I’ve had and I’m equipped with the tools to avoid the issues, however I do think that on balance, there are times I drink too much.

Away from the personal account, it was suggested that I look up some photographers who have captured drinking within the UK.  This would be a good time to add a little more context to my ideas by looking at the work and see where it fits in with what is already there.

A series mentioned was Cardiff After Dark by the photographer Maciej Dakowicz.  Dakowicz is a Polish photographer who took up photography as a profession in 2009, having studied and worked in the computer science field.

The series revolves around St Mary Street in Cardiff.  During the day the street bustles with workers, shoppers and other people carrying out activities you normally associate with a city centre, but during the evening the street takes on a different look.  Pub goers, clubbers and those engaged in the night tine economy take over.  I the series of images we see young people out on a weekend enjoying themselves, although from The Daily Mail it’s a confirmation of the degeneracy of the working class chav culture.  I feel that the images are loud and shout at you, but I do get a sense of vulnerability in them.  Whether it’s the actual inebriated state they are in that leads to vulnerability or some of the images of lone subjects which in itself can be perceived as vulnerable.  The images are in the same vein as Martin Parr and Peter Dench, in that they capture people as they go about their business.

Dakowicz spent 5 years photographing the same streets around Cardiff to complete this series and mentioned that although he became known, he was never out partying with the subjects.  Being a Polish national, the series is from the perspective of an outsider looking in.  Dakowicz mentions that these images wouldn’t be possible in Poland as the subjects wouldn’t be in such a state.

Another photographer that captured drinking culture is Chris Coekin. I the series Knock Three Times, Coekin visits and photographs Acomb Working Men’s Club in York.  Coekin’s family frequented working men’s clubs in the Leicester area and whilst on holiday, these clubs were sybols of working class culture.  With working men’s clubs now in decline, Coekin chose to capture them from 1996, producing a series that managed to capture the roots and identity of Coekin and his family.  Many of the images are of the ephemera of the clubs and act as a historical documentation process, especially as the number of clubs have declined over the years.

The faces in Coekin’s series are faces that I recognise, even though working men’s clubs weren’t a part of my experience growing up.  The faces I recognise are those I saw in the streets and houses around my house and at the weddings and get-togethers, whether formal or informal.  A particular culture that was unique to Scotland was the concept of ‘First Footing’.  The idea is that at midnight on Hogmanay (New Year’s Eve), the first person to cross your doorstep should be tall, dark and handsome.  This is supposed to bring you luck.  The First Footer should bring a lump of coal and a drink, this symbolises warmth to your house for the year and a drink for celebration.  Growing up we always had first footers in for the first week of the New Year and would visit other houses too.  The custom isn’t carried out to the same degree now and appears to have become a victim of modern living where people don’t know neighbours as well as before.  I understand that in smaller communities, or where there hasn’t been a significant influx of arrivals from new areas, then the custom tends to be more popular.

In an earlier exercise we had to produce a series of images that created a typology.  For this I used numerous images of beers that I’ve drunk and shared on Twitter with @GoodBeerTweets and other craft beer drinkers.  Having carried out this exercise, I think I’ll create a typology series on the pubs in Stonehaven and what were pubs.  I’m not sure if I should use the song below as the inspiration or look at some of the text surrounding pub closures and the reasoning behind it.  If so, they will be likely be used in conjunction with the images.

Thirsty & Miserable – Black Flag

Thirsty and miserable
You drop to the floor
You drink ’til you can’t
Even see any more

Thirsty and miserable
Always wanting more
Thirsty and miserable
Always wanting more

My brother wants a ride
To the liquor store
You pity him
For what he wants it for

Thirsty and miserable
Always wanting more
Thirsty and miserable
Always wanting more

It’s 1:30
And we’re all getting nervous
The store closes at two
There’s not enough to last us

Thirsty and miserable
Always wanting more
Thirsty and miserable
Always wanting more

Black Flag (Dez Cadena / Medea / Robo)

 

 

http://www.portofcall.com/about-rehab/alcohol-rehab/real-life-alcohol-stories/

https://roomfordebate.blogs.nytimes.com/2010/06/25/teenage-drinking-diaries/

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/ravishly/my-story-of-alcoholism-and-the-hell-it-took-to-become-aware_b_7279106.html

http://www.rogerebert.com/rogers-journal/my-name-is-roger-and-im-an-alcoholic

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/films/0/daniel-radcliffe-on-alcoholism-starving-himself-harry-potter—a/

http://www.drugfreeworld.org/real-life-stories/alcohol.html

http://www.history.ac.uk/reviews/review/1738

http://www.metrolyrics.com/thirsty-miserable-lyrics-black-flag.html

http://immortalalcoholic.blogspot.co.uk/

https://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/the-high-functioning-alcoholic/201510/fools-rules-justifying-drinking

http://www.edinburghnews.scotsman.com/news/health/heavy-drinkers-in-capital-dying-25-years-younger-study-finds-1-4510151

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/finance/newsbysector/retailandconsumer/11283995/The-real-reasons-for-the-tragic-demise-of-the-British-pub-industry.html

http://iea.org.uk/sites/default/files/publications/files/Briefing_Closing%20time_web.pdf

https://iea.org.uk/blog/whos-killing-the-british-pub

Part 5: 00 - Removing the Figure

Exercise 5.3 – Journey

Exercise 5.3 – Journey

‘’Your journey may not involve travelling the world or an excursion across Russia. You might see your journey to the post office every Monday as particularly relevant – or the journey from your bed to the kitchen in the morning. Note the journeys you go on regularly and reflect upon them.

Now photograph them. Remember to aim for consistency in your pictures. If you choose to photograph all the charity shops you’ve visited in a week, try to photograph them all using the same camera, lens, standing position, lighting, etc. This will help keep your project honed to the subject matter rather than you, the photographer.’’

The Journey will be that of me walking to work from my house to the changing area before I begin my shift.  The reason for this?  It’s about as far as I could get from the actual Journey I’d like to photograph – Australia.

My plan was always to move back but that won’t happen now, unless there’s an agreement for free movement of people between the countries of the UK, Australia, New Zealand and Canada which has been mooted post-Brexit vote.  If this did happen then that’d be a silver cloud to the Brexit vote.  As it stands, I have a pretty uninspiring job, although it is bearable because of my studies with the OCA, and the uninspiringness of it is in sharp contrast with how inspired and wonderful I found Australia. I’ve always felt that Australia is where I should have been born and brought up.

So, I’ll try and capture the essence of my job as I journey to work and finally get changed into my uniform for the day.

Part 5: 00 - Removing the Figure

Reflection Point – Journey

Reflection point – Journey

‘’Where would you choose to do a project of this scale given the chance? What would you choose as your subject matter? What worlds would you like to create?’’

Australia.

I travelled around Australia from March 2004 to March 2005 on a year’s visa in a beat up old (1984) white Ford Falcon.  It was out there I purchased my first digital point and shoot camera and began dabbling in photography. I did have an old film camera many years ago but hadn’t used for years. It’s because I wanted to be able to take far better quality of images that I discovered the OCA and began my studies with the college.

Although later than my time in Australia, Trent Parks’ Minutes to Midnight series of images as he travelled around the continent are a great influence.  Trent is a native of Australia and was taking images of his home nation but was still a stranger in many aspects because the country is so large and communities separated.  I would like to take the images from the perspective of a tourist/backpacker and would look to capture a combination of the tourist/backpacker sites along with what you a Northern European finds so strange and at the same time fascinating about the country.  I’d be looking to capture how many of the backpackers visit many of the same sites and yet each person has their own experience.  Looking back now, the greatest part of the experience was the meeting of people from all corners of the globe and exchanging stories and the chance encounters with people who you either knew, or who knew people from where you were from.  It really reinforced the idea that the world is pretty small.

The world would be full of colour with strangers enjoying the company of strangers.  It would try to capture the transience of the backpacking world and hopefully work as a metaphor for the transience of the human experience.